Saturday, December 12, 2015

It's okay

It's okay to make mistakes.
It's okay to try and fail.
It's okay to stumble and fall.

Get up. Brush off. Move forward. Carry on.

It's okay to be youthful and naive and make decisions that prove to be poor.

There is no shame in not knowing what you have not yet learned.

It's okay to be naive and trusting at any age, to realize you will never know everything there is to know, that no matter how carefully you live and learn, sometimes you will still find yourself being taken for a fool.

It's no shame on you when others take advantage of your trust.

There is no shame.
There is no blame.

Life is a lifelong process of learning, discovering, trying and doing and sometimes failing, sometimes succeeding, and sometimes just saying, "Well, I learned something new."

It's okay to be simply human.

You don't have to have all the answers.

You don't even have to know all the questions.

And when you do have some questions, it's okay to question the questions as well as the answers.

You will never, ever "get there."

You have been here all along.

Thursday, August 20, 2015

Positively speaking, this needs to change

Recently I ran across a meme with words worth pondering:

Ever known a narcissist? They will verbally and emotionally abuse you, using put downs, criticisms, and insults. Then when you stand up for yourself, they come unglued and say you are the toxic one.

That really applies to the pattern of emotional and verbal abuse as a whole, not just to narcissism, and it is exactly spot on. It got me thinking about the times, from childhood on, when I experienced bullying and abuse, and about the pattern I saw more often than not: When I would say or do something to protest the abuse, I was the one who got in trouble for "making a fuss" or such like. From what I am told about the experiences of others, that is the typical pattern.

Why is this? Why is the tendency to blame the victim rather than the bully/abuser? Why do people tend to want to sweep it all under the rug, or say, well, you must have played a part in provoking the bully/abuser, or just look the other way and say nothing? Why do we shame the child for pointing out the truth that the emperor is buck naked?

A part of me really just wants to live a quiet creative life in peace and solitude, making nice writing and nice art and having no ripples in my pond, and chasing away those who would disturb my peace. Then another part of me remembers that disturbers still disturb, whether it's my peace or someone else's, and that part of me wants to speak out and use my considerable voice to help effect lasting social change.

In any case, whatever my particular role on Planet Earth, we as a society need to change the messages that ignore or excuse abuse. Positive thinking means recognizing our power to create positive and permanent shifts in our lives and in our culture. It does not mean pretending everything is fine just the way it is.

So I am positive that the simple act of speaking my truth is one step towards creating the vision of a safe and healthy society for all of us.  And so it is.

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Pride Arises, After the Fall

Can you be proud
    of me
for having survived abuse,
    for growing to become
confident, strong, secure?

Can you be proud?

Can you be proud
    of me
for making the best of
    a bad situation,
a night I never wanted,
    a life-changing detour
of my dreams?

Can you be proud?

Can you be proud
    of me
for finishing college
    with an honors GPA
while raising a child
    all on my own?

Can you be proud?

Can you be proud
    of the hours I worked,
    the persistence that paid,
    the betrayals I endured,
    the judgments I overcame,

the triumph
    that, in spite of the mudslingers,
    became my life?

Can you be proud
    that I spoke out,
    that I still speak,
    that I keep speaking
    with the strength of

my loud, proud voice--

Can you be proud?


Can, or cannot,
    I suppose,
es macht nichts.


I AM.

Proud.


(2015)

Sunday, August 2, 2015

Blue Moon Ascending

When at last I saw
    what I saw
not what I thought I saw

When I recognized the mind
    field of ridicule and shame

--not the way

it had to be

When I tired of getting
    shouted down
       put down
          held down
            let down

When I spoke
    and they would keep speaking
    as if I never had spoken

monkey in the middle
    of words to which

I was denied admission

When at last I admitted,
    allowed myself to

       SEE

Someday They Will See
    is a fairy tale
    with no happy ending

Then I said,
    to the only one who was listening:

What AM I
    holding on to?


And I let go.


(2015)

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Bullying serves a purpose

In recent years there's been a lot of awareness raised about bullying and abuse. Many voices are saying they want to put an end to the cultural acceptance of bullying and create instead a culture in which everyone feels safe and respected.

I wonder if that's really what everyone wants.

Bullying involves keeping people feeling powerless, afraid, intimidated, and lying low in hopes of avoiding being targeted. Such people are much easier to control than people who feel fundamentally confident, strong, secure, and safe. If some people have a vested interest in maintaining that culture of fear and control, they will not support efforts to transform that culture into one of safety and respect.

Think about it.

All through my school years I waited patiently for everyone to grow up and grow out of that pressure to take cues from everyone else and to fit in with everyone else. At midlife, I am seriously considering that maybe the real, unspoken point was for those of us who didn't "fit in" to realize that we were "supposed" to learn how to fit in, and to hide whatever about ourselves persistently did not "fit in."

Peer pressure, in this light, is not a mere adolescent phase but an essential element of our culture and the institutions of our society.

Think about it.

And then decide if that's what you really want to see, and to be, in the world.


Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Gender Whatever

Growing up in the Seventies, I used to sing, "I am woman, hear me roar," with great gusto.  Stereotyped sex roles were a thing of the past.  Bring on diversity!  Free to be you and me.  Do the work you love, wear the clothes you want to wear, and if anyone insists that pink is for girls and blue is for boys, tell them to bury those outdated views with the rest of the dinosaurs.  "Feminine" and "masculine" were now considered purely subjective social judgments about neutral personality traits; being a woman or a man simply meant you were born in a female or male body, regardless of what you liked to do or how you liked to dress.

And I thought that was the last word on sex, gender, and freedom, until transgender people began to raise their voices and speak out more and more often, taking their place on everyone's radar screen, invisible no more.

And I found myself challenged to reconsider, again, the meanings of sex and gender and society.

That some people born with a male body preferred to live in "feminine" ways, and some people born with a female body preferred to live in "masculine" ways, I could easily understand.  I've never understood why so many other people made such a big deal about strict gender roles that are totally arbitrary and totally made up.  As long as you do no harm, do what you will.

What I couldn't grasp was how it was possible for people inhabiting the body of one sex to have an internal experience of being the other sex.  To me, being a woman simply meant my inner self--soul, spirit, psyche, what-have-you--happened to inhabit a female body; being a man simply meant a person's inner self happened to inhabit a male body.  Free people were androgynous souls who happened to land in whatever bodies they landed in and didn't particularly care which body as long as the soul was free to be what it wanted to be.

I don't have an internal sense of being gendered.  And for much of my life, influenced by the zeitgeist of the 1970s, I thought that when people claimed to have an internal, intrinsic experience of gender, it was nothing more than societal conditioning and stereotyping.

Reading and hearing the experiences of transgender people challenged that assumption.  At first I dismissed it as a case of Old Stereotypes Die Hard, that men simply didn't feel free to adopt "feminine" traits as men, and women didn't feel free to adopt "masculine" traits as women.  But eventually, with more reading and more listening and more pondering, I realized that the matter of gender identity runs more deeply, at a biological level, than "what society says," whether conforming to or contradicting those social norms.

And it finally occurred to me:

Maybe my experience isn't everyone's experience.

And I think, if one by one each of us can begin to grasp that simple idea--that maybe our personal, individual experience of life on Earth is not necessarily a universal norm shared by all--then we just might come a little closer to peace on earth and goodwill towards all.

We don't have to understand everything about every human being to accept them as fellow human beings.  As long as you do no harm, do what you will.